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John Veens

Zurich, Geneve, Switzerland

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Member since October 16, 2012


  • http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/breaking-news/international-financial-news/story-e6frg90f-1226570475906

    WASHINGTON - The International Monetary Fund (IMF) says Spain's reforms under its financial sector support program are close to being complete and the clean-up of its weakest banks is well advanced. BERLINP - Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, under fire at home over corruption allegations, has won praise from German Chancellor Angela Merkel over his handling of Spain's recession-mired economy. ATHENS - Greece narrowed its public deficit to 6.6 per cent of output in 2012, meeting targets pledged to EU-IMF creditors, the finance ministry says. WASHINGTON - Tunisia is nearing agreement with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for a $US1.78 billion ($A1.72 billion) standby loan to protect the economy from external shocks, the IMF says. CAPE TOWN - South Africa has raised farm workers' basic salary by more than 50 per cent after violent strikes in the fruit-growing Cape region in the south, the labour minister has announced. LONDON - Britain's banks will be broken up if they fail to ring-fence retail operations from their investment divisions to avoid any future state bailouts of lenders, finance minister George Osborne has warned. LONDON - Bonuses at part-nationalised Lloyds will be the lowest of any British bank this year, its chairman has told MPs. JOHANNESBURG - Strike-scarred AngloAmerican Platinum has reported huge losses, revealing deep damage from a tough...

  • Cooper chung international news

    Environment, Environmental Design

    http://socialenterprise.guardian.co.uk/social-enterprise-network/2013/jan/29/taiwan-hong-kong-social-innovation

    The two tiger economies will benefit greatly from collaboration – it will also bring them better social prosperity. Taiwan and Hong Kong are closely connected to each other, culturally and commercially. Both take pride in inheriting the best ancient Chinese cultural practices, from drinking Oolong tea and practicing martial arts, to respecting elders. Commercially, more than 400 flights go between Taiwan and Hong Kong on a weekly basis, making the route one of the top 10 "busiest commercial airline routes" in the world in 2011. After the 2008 world financial crisis, both economies started to search for a new model of development, a model integrating innovation with broader social needs. The World Economic Forum (WEF) categorises both Taiwan and Hong Kong as economies that have reached the state of "innovation-driven growth", the third stage of economic development. (Stage 1 of development is "factor-driven development", and State 2 is "efficiency-driven development"). Hong Kong ranked No9 in WEF's Global Competitive Index with a score of 5.4, while Taiwan ranked No 13 with a score of 5.3. And yet, 9.2% of businesses in Taiwan and 16.2% in Hong Kong selected "insufficient capacity to innovate" as one of the top five problems in doing businesses. Despite both economies' highly-developed social welfare systems, they bo...

  • Cooper4_177_

    http://money.cnn.com/2012/10/15/news/economy/bernanke-fed-criticism/

    HONG KONG (CNNMoney) -- Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke defended the central bank Sunday, insisting that its actions had not hindered economic growth in developing countries. Fed policies -- especially continued quantitative easing -- have been criticized by some in the international community who say the actions are distorting currency markets and capital flows in emerging economies. Officials in some of those markets -- including China -- have voiced concern that the Fed's easy-money policies have the potential to create asset bubbles, currency appreciation and inflation. Guido Mantega, Brazil's finance minister, has beenparticularly critical of the Fed, alleging it has contributed to a "monetary tsunami" that is hindering growth. The Fed announced last month that it would embark on a third round of bond-buying stimulus. The policy, known as quantitative easing and often abbreviated as QE3, entails buying $40 billion in mortgage-backed securities each month. But Bernanke argued Sunday that those policies are not to be blamed for trouble in emerging markets. "It is not at all clear that accommodative policies in advanced economies impose net costs on emerging market economies," the Fed chief said during a speech in Tokyo, Japan. Bernanke said that capital flows are influenced by many factors, and changes cannot be attributed wholesale to the monetary policy choices of developed ec...