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Luan Pereira

Sao Paulo, Brazil

Member since March 09, 2014


  • 73271431_132_

    Insurance investigators research and verify claims to make sure no fraud or cheating is involved. They search records and databases, conduct personal interviews and inspect damaged vehicles, property and buildings. They also write reports of their findings and cooperate with other investigators and law enforcement professionals. Although investigator jobs often require only a high school diploma, many hiring managers prefer candidates with relevant work experience or education. Some investigators must be licensed.

    High School Insurance companies usually require a high school education or the equivalent for insurance investigator jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Take speech classes or join the debate club in high school to develop the interviewing skills you will need as a future investigator. Take courses in English and writing to prepare for the report-writing component of an investigator's career.

    College Training Some insurance companies prefer to hire investigators with college degrees, although no degree is mandatory. The desired degree varies with the type of claims work. For example, an engineering degree is useful for investigating claims in factories, while an accounting degree equips you to investigate business fraud. A bachelor's degree in criminal justice is another path to the job of insurance investigator. A criminal justice program provides a legal background plus the necessary skills in research, investigation and critical thinking.

    M...

  • Health-dictionary-thumb-775x294-12004_177_

    Northjersey.com

    A recent meeting with a client reminded me that while the vocabulary of our industry may be second nature to those of us in the industry, it may feel like a foreign language, creating the first barrier to understanding, for those of you trying to navigate the health insurance arena. Therefore, today we will offer a user-friendly listing of the terms you may encounter.

    PREMIUM – The money you pay to have an insurance product. Similar to when you check out at the grocery store and pay for your sacks of groceries, premium is what you pay for the product you purchased.

    DEDUCTIBLE – Deductible is the amount of money you will pay out of your pocket before the health insurance plan starts to pay. Deductibles can vary by carrier, and plan. The Medicare Part A (Hospital coverage) deductible in 2014 is $1,216 per benefit period. The Medicare Part B (Medical IE: Doctor appointments etc) deductible in 2014 is $147 per year. If your current health insurance is through an employer, you may have a deductible as low as $250 or as high as $5,000. Most deductibles these days are per calendar year.

    COBRA - Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) is a federal law that may allow you to temporarily keep health coverage after your employment ends, you lose coverage as a dependent of the covered employee, or another qualifying event. If you elect COBRA coverage, you pay 100 percent of the premiums, including the share the employer used to pay, plus an administr...

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My Interests

  • Industrial Design
  • Environmental Design
  • Communication Design
  • Fashion Design
  • Audio/Visual Design