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Ritesh Reddy

Mumbai, India

Thinker

Member since January 19, 2009


  • Graffiti

    Environment, Environmental Design

    Graffiti_1_177_

    The search for truth can take us to the most unlikely places. For graffiti artists, manipulating letters became lifeblood and fighting back meant getting ill, and ill-legible. Once harnessed, an unusual torrent of creative, language-based experimentation and expression flowed from urban cities. It turned tables, oppressed the oppressor, and lit the fuse for a contemporary graffiti movement.

    "Getting up", the recognition that comes with the near constant act of tagging your name, became the driving force in the nascent graffiti scene. As a result the application of tags proliferated through crowded urban housing projects and high-traffic public transit systems until surfaces were covered in permanent inks. The competitive nature of graffiti, a hold-over from urban gang activity, was played out in non-violent "battles" that featured spray cans and skill instead of knives and strength. (The competitive nature of graffiti would seep into and boost the related youth sub-culture of hip-hop dance and music.) More importantly, competition brought about the stylistic innovations that were necessary to distinguish one tag from the rest. These revealed themselves in unique hand styles and lettering including the use of bubble letters, complicated scripts, calligraphic flourishes, flexible ascenders and descenders, new ligatures, simple illustrations, and cartoon characters. In many cases a combination of these left tags illegible to all but the graffiti artists. By...

  • Psychologists tell us that after horrific events, such as the September 11 terrorist attacks in the US and the November 26 terror strikes in Mumbai, people tend to react initially with shock, fear, confusion, sadness, and anger, but then they want to take some kind of action. This urge to do something may result from a desire for revenge, but it also stems from a need people have to regain control of a situation, and to do so in the most effective way possible, using whatever special expertise they can bring to bear. This was certainly true for me. If he response about how computer graphics technologies can be used to stop terrorism—is any indication, it was also true for many others in the computer graphics community, though I’m sure pure altruism and patriotism on the part of the respondents were major factors as well.

    The response was impressive. Some 70 respondents offered innovative ideas for employing computer graphics tools and techniques in a host of applications, ranging from improving airline safety and enhancing emergency-response training to employing counter-terrorist measures and raising consciousness about the precursors and aftermath of terrorism.

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Men are not prisoners of fate, but only prisoners of their own minds

Contact Ritesh Reddy
r3flux design

My Interests

  • Industrial Design
  • Environmental Design
  • Communication Design
  • Fashion Design
  • Audio/Visual Design