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Shana Agid

New York , NY, United States

Member since November 20, 2008


  • I told a few of you I'd share some ideas about how to run a charrette with people not accustomed to drawing in groups in this way.

    So:

    1. Think about what you would find most helpful not only to hear from the people in you NFP, but what you think would be most interesting or helpful to get from them as a group, thinking together, as this is the major difference between a charrette and an interview.

    2. Identify questions that you'd like to help them think about, especially that you need to know more about. Some examples: What are the keys issues that determine the problem or situation? What would they like to see, if they could do anything, as a solution to the problem or a way of dealing with the issue? (encourage them to think big - this could render some great info.) What are the key obstacles or struggles?

    3. Post-it's! Hand out stacks of post-it notes because they might be better with thinking on their feet with words than with drawings. Ask the group to spend 10-15 minutes doug a quick brainstorm on the question(s) you're asking. Have them write words and phrases on the post-its. When the brainstorm is done, you can use that as anjpimg off point for discussion or ask themto work together to sort out the pieces they'd most want you to work with in your project, or to order or make suggestions or wild ideas about what's possible. Remember that some of the best ideas will come from the outside edges of what seems impossible to the people at your NFP.

    ...