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Jesse Resnick

New York, NY, United States

Member since September 08, 2008


  • Board_177_

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  • User Testing

    Communication

    Prototypes_177_

    My user testing is condensed, as it involves several repetitive testing sessions with the same group of individuals. As posted earlier, I planned my first few user testing sessions to acclimate the child to my product, and allow them to get comfortable with the materials, form, placement around their wrist, etc.

    The testing took place in the OT (occupational therapy) room, with two of the OT instructors. OT is where the children learn and work on fine motor skills, as well as management of their behaviours. I thought this would be the most comfortable place to first introduce the products. I brought in a few prototypes, the track sample, the initial rubber prototype, and the second dragon skin prototype. The prototypes were placed near the 'fidget box,' so that the kids could associate them with something they were already familiar with using. One of the teachers and I sat by the prototypes and called the children over individually to see what they thought of the prototypes and how they responded.

    Much to my surprise, the children were very quick to get comfortable with the products! The first student I tested with was a 10-year old boy named Cameron. He first picked up the dragon skin, and began stretching it. I showed him how the nubs could be pulled on, and he loved pulling at them and stretching them. I then showed him the first rubber prototype, and he let me put it around his wrist. He told us that he liked the prototype around his wrist, but did not like that the m...

  • User Testing

    Communication

    Prototypes_177_

    My user testing is condensed, as it involves several repetitive testing sessions with the same group of individuals. As posted earlier, I planned my first few user testing sessions to acclimate the child to my product, and allow them to get comfortable with the materials, form, placement around their wrist, etc.

    The testing took place in the OT (occupational therapy) room, with two of the OT instructors. OT is where the children learn and work on fine motor skills, as well as management of their behaviours. I thought this would be the most comfortable place to first introduce the products. I brought in a few prototypes, the track sample, the initial rubber prototype, and the second dragon skin prototype. The prototypes were placed near the 'fidget box,' so that the kids could associate them with something they were already familiar with using. One of the teachers and I sat by the prototypes and called the children over individually to see what they thought of the prototypes and how they responded.

    Much to my surprise, the children were very quick to get comfortable with the products! The first student I tested with was a 10-year old boy named Cameron. He first picked up the dragon skin, and began stretching it. I showed him how the nubs could be pulled on, and he loved pulling at them and stretching them. I then showed him the first rubber prototype, and he let me put it around his wrist. He told us that he liked the prototype around his wrist, but did not like that the m...

  • User Testing Scenario

    Communication

    Eval_2_177_

    I created two user testing scenarios, and created instructional/observational sheets for both because I will not be present for all of the user testing sessions (I will be there for the first few, but the school will also continue testing as often as once/day).

    The first testing scenario is intended to acclimate the child to the wristband. After speaking to one of my contacts from the NSSR, I realized that it may take some time for the children to get used to having something on their wrist. She suggested setting aside a few days of testing for the students to touch and interact with the product so that they could get comfortable with it before I went further. I created a list of questions/observations to take note of when performing the testing, which can be seen in Eval 1 down below.

    The second testing scenario was made to teach the children how to use the wristband effectively. It is intended for use after the student has become comfortable with the product. I detailed and illustrated the instruction process, and included space to take quick observations on how the child responded (mostly yes/no questions, and a few time-related questions). This instruction sheet can be seen in Eval 2 down below.

    Eval 1 Eval 2

  • Mid Review Summary

    Communication

    I got a lot of helpful feedback at the review last Monday. One of the main comments I got was about unity - unifying the design of each wristband so that they look like a family of products. Many suggested that I could do this with colour, some also suggested integrating similar forms into each wristband. Creating a universal timer design for use in each wristband was also discussed. A few people also suggested that the devices could have a secondary 'teaching function.' For example, the device could work as an mp3 player, that would play a short lesson for the child to listen to. I thought that it was an interesting idea, and could perhaps teach the child subliminally. Other people suggested ideas for a third wristband (it was decided that I should either develop one or three wristbands). Some ideas were a heat sensitive fabric that would turn colours when touched, or a gel similar to a stress ball, or a woven rubber structure.

    Form/Material

    A reviewer pointed out that depending on material, the wristbands would take on different characteristics. For example, plastic would give a more futuristic feel, while wood would give a more earthy, organic feel. Another reviewer mentioned that the wristband I had intended to make in plastic could be made in wood on a 5-axis router if I wanted it to take on a different feel. Other reviewers also mentioned the importance of the feel of each material on the skin - the softness of the rubber and/or the hardness/smoothness of the plastic...

  • Presentation Board 2

    Communication

    Board2_177_

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  • Presentation Board 1

    Communication

    Board1_177_

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  • Autism Blogger

    Communication

    Picture_1_177_

    I joined the blog, "Autism Blogger," a few days ago. I found that there are several parents and a few professionals on the site, and I thought it would be useful to post my project description to see if anyone was interested. So far, about 70 people have read my post and I have gotten one comment. I am hoping that over time more people will read and comment on my posting. I have also found a few people on the blog that I am particularly interested in speaking to, and sent them a message asking them to take a quick look at my page.

    If you would like to take a look at my page on the site, click here.

  • Revised Executive Brief

    Communication

    My mission is to develop an effective way for autistic children to self-manage their stereotypic/self-stimulatory behaviours in an educational setting.

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects nearly one in every one hundred-fifty children born in the United States. Children are typically diagnosed between the ages of two and three, but it can be detected as early as twelve to eighteen months.

    Some of the common characteristics of an autistic individual include impairments in social behaviour, including both verbal and non-verbal communication; a resistance to change in routine and insistence on sameness; and a preoccupation with objects/movements often exhibited through atypical play patterns and self-stimulatory behaviours (stereotypy).

    There have been several methods documented to curb and/or stop stereotypy in the autistic community, most of which teach the child that his/her behaviour is wrong. My view is that the behaviour is not wrong, but rather needs to be practiced in moderation. The design proposal I have developed is intended to teach the child self-management of these behaviours as an alternative to discouraging them. This is necessary because repetitive behaviours give the child a sense of safety and security. It is important, however, to manage stereotypy as it distracts the child significantly from engaging in the environment around them.

    My ultimate goal for the product I am designing is to enhance the quality of life for the autistic community. While my spe...

  • User Testing Scenario

    Communication

    Who will be the users for your first test?

    The users for my first test will be a small group of autistic children. I think it will be most effective to test each user individually first, so that they can be taught how to use the device.

    What criteria will you use to select the individuals who will test your prototype? Will they be selected randomly in a public place?

    I will need to work with the teachers from the institutions in order to select appropriate candidates for user testing. Ideally, I would like to test students that perform different stereotypic behaviours to see if a particular device works for them best, whether they all work equally, or whether they do not work at all.

    Will they be a controlled group selected by your NFP or yourself?

    It will be a controlled group selected by my NFP. Most likely, the NFP will identify students that it feels are best suited to the user testing.

    If a control group, will you use them for all 3 tests?

    I would like to use the same students for all three tests because it will take some time for them to learn how to use the device. I think it would be most effective to see a progression of use over time, so that I could see if the students became more comfortable/less comfortable using the device after each testing session.

    What type of environment will you test them in?

    I will be testing them in their school environment. There is an OT (occupational therapy) instructor that has her own room where the students learn specific...

My Interests

  • Industrial Design
  • Environmental Design
  • Communication Design
  • Fashion Design
  • Audio/Visual Design