Join our network of non-profits, companies and individuals who believe social change can happen through design.

Become A Member
avatar

Ashlee Ketchum

Southampon, England, United Kingdom

volunteer

Member since July 03, 2013


  • Yogurt_177_

    http://www.environmentalleader.com/2013/07/02/yogurt-companies-face-whey-disposal-problem/

    Greek yogurt is a booming $2 billion a year industry with popular brands including Chobani and Dannon. But it produces millions of pounds of waste that industry insiders are scrambling to figure out what to do with, Modern Farmer reports.

    Greek yogurt is strained, unlike other varieties of yogurt, and the byproduct is a thin, runny, acid whey that cannot be dumped because it becomes toxic as it decomposes, robbing rivers and streams of oxygen, author Justin Elliott writes.

    New York’s Greek yogurt industry tripled in size over the last five years with companies in the state producing a total of 150 million gallons of acid whey last year, Modern Farmer says.

    Companies like Chobani typically make 1 ounce of creamy yogurt out of 3 to 4 ounces of milk. The rest becomes acid whey. Dumping the runny waste is illegal. Greek yogurt companies, food scientists and state government officials are in a hurry to figure out not only uses for the whey, but also how to make a profit off of it.

    In New York, Chobani has been trying to get rid of its vast quantities of acid whey by paying dairy farmers to take it and sending truckloads to their farms. The farmers have been experimenting with it, mixing whey with manure, into cattle feed and converting some of it into biogas that powers their farms and even supplies the local utility with power.

    But there are problems with this method of disposal. In...

  • Yogurt_177_

    http://www.environmentalleader.com/2013/07/02/yogurt-companies-face-whey-disposal-problem/

    Greek yogurt is a booming $2 billion a year industry with popular brands including Chobani and Dannon. But it produces millions of pounds of waste that industry insiders are scrambling to figure out what to do with, Modern Farmer reports.

    Greek yogurt is strained, unlike other varieties of yogurt, and the byproduct is a thin, runny, acid whey that cannot be dumped because it becomes toxic as it decomposes, robbing rivers and streams of oxygen, author Justin Elliott writes.

    New York’s Greek yogurt industry tripled in size over the last five years with companies in the state producing a total of 150 million gallons of acid whey last year, Modern Farmer says.

    Companies like Chobani typically make 1 ounce of creamy yogurt out of 3 to 4 ounces of milk. The rest becomes acid whey. Dumping the runny waste is illegal. Greek yogurt companies, food scientists and state government officials are in a hurry to figure out not only uses for the whey, but also how to make a profit off of it.

    In New York, Chobani has been trying to get rid of its vast quantities of acid whey by paying dairy farmers to take it and sending truckloads to their farms. The farmers have been experimenting with it, mixing whey with manure, into cattle feed and converting some of it into biogas that powers their farms and even supplies the local utility with power.

    But there are problems with this method of disposal. In...