Join our network of non-profits, companies and individuals who believe social change can happen through design.

Become A Member
avatar

Pana Inn

Panama

Member since June 13, 2013


  • A growing demand for milk and cheese in China has the potential to bring California's beleaguered dairy industry back to life --- and with it, renewed concern about its damaging effects on the environment.

    As China's middle class grows, so does its penchant for dairy products such as milk, cheese and yogurt. U.S. government data show that Chinese demand for dairy products is growing rapidly. For instance, between 2011 and 2012, imports of skimmed milk powder grew by 49 percent and are expected to increase an additional 18 percent this year.

    And although China is trying to build its nascent dairy industry to meet this demand, it relies heavily on imports of high-protein feed. That includes one of California's most water-intensive crops, alfalfa.

    "Exports (of alfalfa) to China are definitely increasing," said Daniel Putnam, an agronomist at the University of California, Davis. "We've seen a pretty dramatic rise since 2006, and I think all expectations are that it will probably increase again this year."

    But this news, and the already-documented toll California's large dairy farms are having on air and water quality in the Central Valley, is making many environmentalists nervous.

    "Definitely, there's a carrying capacity for dairy, and it's air quality," said Brent Newell, legal director for the Center on Race, Poverty & the Environment, an environmental justice organization that focuses mostly on the San Joaquin Valley. "You can't keep...

  • Crown Capital Eco Jakarta Management Renewable Energy Investments Shift to Developing Nations on CRAIGLIST

    Renewable energy investments are shifting to developing nations as countries from Morocco to Chile pursue power sources that wean them off fossil fuel imports, two studies promoted by the United Nations said.

    China’s $67 billion of investment in wind, solar and other renewable projects led developing nations to $112 billion of spending in 2012, according to an e-mailed statement today from the UN and other groups involved in the studies. That compares with $132 billion of expenditure in the industrialized world.

    The gap on renewables spending between richer and developing countries shrank to 18 percent last year from 250 percent in 2007, marking a “dramatic change” in investment patterns, the statement said. Two-thirds of the 138 nations that now have clean-energy targets are in the developing world.

    “The uptake of renewable energies continues worldwide as countries, companies and communities seize the linkages between low-carbon green economies and a future of energy access and security,” UN Environment Program Executive Director Achim Steiner said in the statement. “More and more countries are set to take the renewable energy stage,” he said, citing “the logic and the rationale of embracing a green development path.”

    UNEP and the Frankfurt School of Finance and Management worked with Bloomberg New Energy Finance to produce one of today’s repo...

Pana Inn

Contact Pana Inn

My Interests

  • Industrial Design
  • Environmental Design
  • Communication Design
  • Fashion Design
  • Audio/Visual Design