Hass and Associates

Hass and Associates

Communication, Community, Environment

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  • Google-recently-acquired--011_177_

    Profitt er bak begge bedriftenes investeringer i ubemannet fly, hva gjelder de kan couch det i

    Tilbake i de dårlige gamle dagene under den kalde krigen var en av de mest Ærede grenene av unøyaktig sciences Kremlinology. I vest, Aviser, thinktanks og regjeringer kan du beholdt spesialister hvis jobb var å granske hver skrap av bevis, sladder og ryktene kommer fra Moskva i håp om at det ville gi noen anelse om hva de sovjetiske lederne var opp til. Inntil nylig, denne bestemt spesialiteten hadde tydeligvis gått i terminal nedgang, men hendelsene i Ukraina har ført til dens inntrengende reinstatement.

    Kommersielle tilsvarende Kremlinology er Google og Facebook-se. Selv om overfladisk mer åpen enn Putin regimet, er begge organisasjonene pathologically hemmelighetsfull om deres langsiktige ambisjoner og strategier. Så er de av oss i denne merkelige tilskuersport drevet til å lese rapporter fra aksjemarkedet analytikere og andre ephemera, som tilsvarer teknologiske rådgivning innvollene av nylig halshogd kyllinger.

    Det er uhyggelig arbeid, men noen har å gjøre det, så la oss se det lille vi vet og se om vi kan gjøre noen følelse av det. Først av alt, hva vi vet sikkert? Vi vet først og fremst at disse to selskapene drives av smarte folk som har en dyp forståelse av evner og potensial av datateknologi. Vi vet også at disse folkene: total kontroll av sine selskaper på grunn av en slu tolags eierandel struktur, som effektivt frigjør dem fra aksjemarkedet kontroll; storma...

  • Hass and Associates: Missile Attack on Syria

    Community, Communication Design

    Strike-on-syria-could-trigger-retaliatory-attacks-cyberwar_300813014558_177_

    The cyber-attacks carried out by Syria last week were much more broad than initially reported, and they amounted to a warning shot of the retaliation the U.S. could expect if it should attack. Subsequent attacks would most likely go after U.S. infrastructure, and given how fragile it is and the likelihood Iran or North Korea would help out, the result could be massive.

    As I write this, the U.S. has deployed a battle group to Syria in preparation for a missile strike against the government there, and Russia has deployed what appears to be a counter force. What most seem not to be factoring in is that Syria has already fired its warning shot with attacks on Twitter and The New York Times, at least.

    I say "at least," because reporting of attacks isn't comprehensive, and other attempts may have failed, so Syria's first strike may have been far larger than initially reported.

    The U.S. has a tendency to overreact, and it is clear there's insufficient preparation for the infrastructure collapse that could occur when Syria responds to a missile attack -- and Russia exists as a wild card that could cause the conflict to spread rapidly out of control.

    It's been common knowledge for some time that the U.S. infrastructure is vulnerable to outside attack and that governments like Syria and China have been probing it and probably know exactly where and how to do the most damage. There's a very real likelihood that this time the U.S. won't go unscathed, and it may be prudent ...

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    hass and associates HA code34912726002, Anonymous claim to have hacked Fema's servers after posting staff details online in retaliation against 'threats' from the agency

    The Anonymous hacking group is claiming to have hacked the US Federal Emergency Management Agency servers after posting staff details online.

    The group said it posted the details online because 'oblique and cowardly implied threats against Anonymous very much back into the forefront of the hive's consciousness'.

    In a document published online Wednesday, the hacker collective revealed data that includes information on user accounts and passwords of what appear to be government employees.

    According to motherboard.com, the document contains email addresses and contact details for hundreds of contacts including police and fire departments, FBI special agents and a 'Bioterrorism Coordinator Chair.'

    Anonymous said it redacted social security numbers and login information because its 'intent is not to harm, merely to issue a firm warning,' reported the Guardian.

    'Anonymous does not wave the white flag. Not while we are faced with a daily stream of abominable revelations from Edward Snowden and others, not while the battle for the very soul, the very original purpose, of the internet escalates in severity daily,' read a statement by a representative of Anonymous and obtained by GlobalPost.

    ...
  • Kilde-Link

    En mulig Internett svindel som involverer en jobbsite har blitt rapportert til Cascade County Sheriff's Office.

    En arbeidssøker informert lensmannen kontor av svindel, som involverte www.montanahelpwanted.com, ifølge en CCSO utgivelse. Jobb-søkende gjorde et intervju over direktemeldinger med et firma som heter åpen verden Data Inc. Selskapet informert jobb søkere var det åpner et kontor i Great Falls, og jobb-søkere ville være den første ansatt i selskapet. Som sådan, ble jobb-søkende sendt en sjekk i mengden av $1800 og beskjed om å kjøpe office-produkter. Jobb-søkende ble instruert til å wire pengene tilbake til en person med navnet Carmine Firtato.

    "Personen undersøkt sjekken og det dukket opp til henne å være mistenkt, sa utgivelsen. "Hun tok kontrollen til en bank, og de bekreftet sjekken var ikke bra og at dette var en svindel."

    Sjekken hadde navnet "Western Pacific Escrow" av California trykt opp på den, og åpen verden Data Inc. ble plassert i Florida. Sjekken ble sendt fra New Jersey, alt etter løslate.

    Sheriff's office release råder beboerne aldri til å akseptere sjekker fra en ukjent kilde og be banken å gjennomgå sjekker for nøyaktighet. Utgivelsen sier enhver forespørsel å kontanter en sjekk og wire tilbake penger er et rødt flagg.

    For sin del har www.montanahelpwanted.com en del på sin hjemmeside tilbyr råd til jobbsøkere online. Den fastslår ansatte gå gjennom annonser hver dag for å sikre a...

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    Hass associates article code 85258083266-HA, news reviews

    Q. I have heard on many occasions of people being scammed through email and the Internet. I can never imagine being scammed. I'm fairly Internet savvy and my computer and email account have settings to weed out potentially harmful messages. How do people fall for these scams? Why don’t they protect themselves better? Y.D., Quakertown

    A. So you’re completely safe then, right? Think again. Scammers are getting smarter, too. Here are 10 things you should be alert for when going through your email inbox. Keeping your guard up now will prevent you from worrying later.

    • Emails that contain a link as the only content in the body, bit.ly or shortened links that don’t display the actual Web address and hyperlinked text that give you no indication of what you would be clicking. When in doubt, don’t click.

    • An inordinate number of other recipients. If you get an email with hundreds of other addresses in the recipient field, yet the message seems directed to only one person, your scam sense should be on high alert.

    • Questionable subject line. If you receive an email from an address you do not recognize and it contains “no subject,” be careful. If you have no idea what you may be opening, it’s best to leave it alone.

    • Intense enthusiasm. All capital letters is not only annoying, it can also indicate spam when it comes to emails. (e.g. I JUST LOST 45 POUNDS WITH THE XX2 PROGRAM!) Overly enthusiastic emails...

  • Sanjeev Kumar is the head of the insurance practice at Saama Technologies, a business analytics services company.

    hass associates cyber tips and fraud reviews Ten percent of the incurred losses and loss adjustment expenses each year in the property & casualty insurance industry are due to insurance fraud, according to an analysis by The Insurance Information Institute (III). Worse yet, the number of fraudulent claims are on the increase—statistics from the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) show a 19 percent increase in questionable claims from 2009 to 2011. However, most suspicious claims are paid by the insurers; it is estimated that today only one in five fraudulent claims are detected or denied by insurers. Thus insurance fraud costs insurers tens of billions of dollars each year in an industry where margins are thin, and as a result increases premiums for everyone. P&C insurance fraud may be committed at different points in the transaction, most typically by: • Applicants when they misrepresent facts on an insurance application. • Policyholders as they file false or inflated claims (or deliberately perpetrate a crime, such as arson). • Third-party professionals, such as body shops, that provide services to claimants through excessive billing of vehicle body parts or repair work. • Employees, such as adjusters, who may be ‘involved’ in the group. • Agents who may backdate a policy prior to loss date. Fraud is not just limited to property and casualty insuran...

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    Hass associates cyber warning tips and reviews - It is hard to ignore the increasing number of cyber-attacks targeting large corporations and governmental organisations. New stories are appearing almost daily exposing the lengths cybercriminals are going to in order to steal sensitive business and customers' personal information from large corporations and businesses.

    While large corporations still continue to garner a lot of attention from cybercriminals, the reality is that SMBs are also increasingly becoming targets for cyber-attacks. In fact, according to the latest Symantec Internet Security Threat Report, 31 per cent of targeted attacks in 2012 were on businesses with less than 250 employees.

    So why are cybercriminals interested in SMBs? Don't they have bigger fish to fry?

    The question many SMBs may ask is "Why us and not a larger company with more profits or customer information to steal?" Unfortunately the answer is simple: it can be easier. SMBs, on average, have less money and resources invested into internet security and protection, making them an easier target.

    Furthermore, SMBs generally conduct business with many enterprises, and today's sophisticated hackers see them as a potential backdoor into these larger organizations. Known as the "watering hole" technique, an attacker compromises a website, such as a blog or small business website, which is known to be frequently visited by the victim of interest, so when the victim la...

  • Source Link It is hard to ignore the increasing number of cyber-attacks targeting large corporations and governmental organisations. New stories are appearing almost daily exposing the lengths cybercriminals are going to in order to steal sensitive business and customers' personal information from large corporations and businesses. hass associates cyber warning tips and reviews While large corporations still continue to garner a lot of attention from cybercriminals, the reality is that SMBs are also increasingly becoming targets for cyber-attacks. In fact, according to the latest Symantec Internet Security Threat Report, 31 per cent of targeted attacks in 2012 were on businesses with less than 250 employees. So why are cybercriminals interested in SMBs? Don't they have bigger fish to fry? The question many SMBs may ask is "Why us and not a larger company with more profits or customer information to steal?" Unfortunately the answer is simple: it can be easier. SMBs, on average, have less money and resources invested into internet security and protection, making them an easier target. Furthermore, SMBs generally conduct business with many enterprises, and today's sophisticated hackers see them as a potential backdoor into these larger organizations. Known as the "watering hole" technique, an attacker compromises a website, such as a blog or small business website, which is known to be frequently visited by the victim of interest, so when the victim later vis...

  • http://www.fotolog.com/imogemiller/115000000000025840/

    90% of unknown malware is delivered via the web Hass and Associates: Article Number 85258083266 A new study of malware takes an unusual approach – instead of analyzing known malware, it analyzes the unknown malware that traditional defenses miss; and finds that 90% is delivered from the web rather than via emails. The study, The modern malware review, was undertaken by Palo Alto Networks drawing on data from more than 1000 enterprise customers that use its WildFire firewall option. Wildfire analyzes unknown files; that is, files that are neither whitelisted nor blacklisted. It is the unknown files that turned out to be unknown malware that have been analyzed: some 26,000 samples over a period of 3 months. 90% of the undetected malware is delivered via web browsing, implying that traditional AV is better at detecting email-borne viruses. In fact, it takes AV companies four times as long to detect web malware as it does to detect email malware (20 days rather than 5 days). There are several reasons for this. Firstly, since email malware tends to be sent to multiple targets, there are multiple incidences waiting to be found in mailboxes and analyzed. “However a potentially more significant factor,” says the report, “is that web-based malware easily leverages server-side polymorphism.” Put simply, the malware is frequently and rapidly re-encoded to avoid detection, “which vastly reduces the likelihood that AV vendors will be...

  • http://www.shelfari.com/groups/101845/discussions/487576/Hass-and-Associates-Online-Crime-Ware-Warning-and-Online-Fraud-W

    It’s the last thing security professionals want to see: A new hacking method that makes it even harder to detect suspect code in emails. The method is actually a stealthy combination of two favorite attack modes, and it shows that hackers are pulling out all the stops to ensnare computer users in their webs. Phishing and spear phishing have long been thought to be mutually exclusive hacking tricks, but cybercrooks have found a way to combine the two in a technique called longline phishing.

    “The technique allows you to hit a lot of people very quickly and largely go undetected,” Dave Jevans, founder and CTO of Marble Security and founder of the Anti-Phishing Work Group, told TechNewsWorld.

    With spear phishing, which is typically used as a vehicle for advanced persistent threat attacks like the recent one on The New York Times, a select group of connected people are targeted with a highly credible email message based on extensive research of the targets’ backgrounds. “With longlining, you can get hundreds of people exposed to a website that will infect their computers,” Jevans noted.

    He explained that longliners — named after commercial fishermen who use long lines of hooks to catch fish — might send 100,000 emails from 50,000 IP addresses, which makes it difficult to identify an email from a particular server as hacking bait.

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