A Good Life 6 - Parsons The New School for Design

A Good Life 6 - Parsons The New School for Design

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  • Ikea Assembly Instructions

    Communication, Industrial Design

    Picture_2_177_

    Patty talked about Ikea as a great example of assembly instructions, using minimal language and relatively simple illustrations.

    I found THIS page on Ikea's website- it is a list of all their products with a pdf of assembly instructions

    -enjoy

  • Hebopark_led_boardnew4_177_

    I am trying to find a way to create in one act/presentation of user feedback both communal feedback for all the participants in the outdoor gym and a sort of a personal feedback for each user too.

    I came up with few ideas for graphic interpretation of the progress of the activity and the contribution of of the 'users' in a sort of a small "scoreboard" that notifies the electrical load the park gains (thanks to the users) and also a personal (competitive) activity measuring method.

    In the links above you can check them out - i would love to hear more ideas from you guys regarding ways to give a feedback that would encourage users to keep on pedaling...

    feedback scoreboard 1 - click to enlarge

    feedback scoreboard 2 - click to enlarge

    feedback scoreboard 3 - click to enlarge

    feedback scoreboard 4 - click to enlarge

    Thanks!

    Oz.

  • Prototyping -The Mechanism

    Environment, Industrial Design

    Mechanism_and_remarks_177_

    Hebop mechanism1 - click to view image

    Hebop mechanism2 - click to view image

    Hebop mechanism3 - click to view image

    Hebop mechanism + skeleton1 - click to view image

    Hebop mechanism + skeleton2 - click to view image

    Hebop mechanism + skeleton3 - click to view image

    Hebop mechanism + skeleton4 - click to view image

    Hebop pedals part1 - click to view image

    Hebop pedals part2 - click to view image

    I am building the mechanism of the 'Hebop' (pedaling station of the outdoor gym). It consists: a flywheel, pedals + tooth wheel, chain, pulley and a generator. There is a skeleton that holds the mechanism inside the shell in the correct distances between the axises. The shell is 0.25" sheet metal (an image is available in the list of images) and is half above ground (organic shape that follows the handle+seat parts) and half below ground.

    The images above show the process and the different parts of the mechanism (inner parts+shell).

    In latest discussion with the NYC department of parks and recreation - we are trying to get a permit to install the completed 'Hebop' in a park in NY (for 1-2 days without overnight...) around April 25th.

    Time Table for completion of fabrication of the 'Hebop':

    -Monday 3/30: final presentation of installation/mounting methods, feedback, instructions and signage.

    -Monday 3/30: Determine colors (body+active spots such as handles, pedals, etc.) decide type of rubber material for handles.

    -Monday 4/7: mechanism + shell completed, rear p...

  • User Testing

    Communication

    Prototypes_177_

    My user testing is condensed, as it involves several repetitive testing sessions with the same group of individuals. As posted earlier, I planned my first few user testing sessions to acclimate the child to my product, and allow them to get comfortable with the materials, form, placement around their wrist, etc.

    The testing took place in the OT (occupational therapy) room, with two of the OT instructors. OT is where the children learn and work on fine motor skills, as well as management of their behaviours. I thought this would be the most comfortable place to first introduce the products. I brought in a few prototypes, the track sample, the initial rubber prototype, and the second dragon skin prototype. The prototypes were placed near the 'fidget box,' so that the kids could associate them with something they were already familiar with using. One of the teachers and I sat by the prototypes and called the children over individually to see what they thought of the prototypes and how they responded.

    Much to my surprise, the children were very quick to get comfortable with the products! The first student I tested with was a 10-year old boy named Cameron. He first picked up the dragon skin, and began stretching it. I showed him how the nubs could be pulled on, and he loved pulling at them and stretching them. I then showed him the first rubber prototype, and he let me put it around his wrist. He told us that he liked the prototype around his wrist, but did not like that the m...

  • User Testing

    Communication

    Prototypes_177_

    My user testing is condensed, as it involves several repetitive testing sessions with the same group of individuals. As posted earlier, I planned my first few user testing sessions to acclimate the child to my product, and allow them to get comfortable with the materials, form, placement around their wrist, etc.

    The testing took place in the OT (occupational therapy) room, with two of the OT instructors. OT is where the children learn and work on fine motor skills, as well as management of their behaviours. I thought this would be the most comfortable place to first introduce the products. I brought in a few prototypes, the track sample, the initial rubber prototype, and the second dragon skin prototype. The prototypes were placed near the 'fidget box,' so that the kids could associate them with something they were already familiar with using. One of the teachers and I sat by the prototypes and called the children over individually to see what they thought of the prototypes and how they responded.

    Much to my surprise, the children were very quick to get comfortable with the products! The first student I tested with was a 10-year old boy named Cameron. He first picked up the dragon skin, and began stretching it. I showed him how the nubs could be pulled on, and he loved pulling at them and stretching them. I then showed him the first rubber prototype, and he let me put it around his wrist. He told us that he liked the prototype around his wrist, but did not like that the m...

  • User Testing Scenario

    Communication

    Eval_2_177_

    I created two user testing scenarios, and created instructional/observational sheets for both because I will not be present for all of the user testing sessions (I will be there for the first few, but the school will also continue testing as often as once/day).

    The first testing scenario is intended to acclimate the child to the wristband. After speaking to one of my contacts from the NSSR, I realized that it may take some time for the children to get used to having something on their wrist. She suggested setting aside a few days of testing for the students to touch and interact with the product so that they could get comfortable with it before I went further. I created a list of questions/observations to take note of when performing the testing, which can be seen in Eval 1 down below.

    The second testing scenario was made to teach the children how to use the wristband effectively. It is intended for use after the student has become comfortable with the product. I detailed and illustrated the instruction process, and included space to take quick observations on how the child responded (mostly yes/no questions, and a few time-related questions). This instruction sheet can be seen in Eval 2 down below.

    Eval 1 Eval 2

  • Mid-Review/2nd User testing summary

    Communication, Fashion Design

    N517416919_1948135_2629033_177_

    Mid-Review/2nd User testing summary

    Research-I was told that the problems that I am targeting are too broad and too many big ideas are being introduced but not yet established in my designs. Most suggested to narrow my ideas down and to do more research on human physical interaction and how it will strengthen intimacy in relationships.

    Prototypes/Designs-Majority of the critics enjoyed my project and meanwhile I’ve gotten various different opinions and perspectives regarding of my “next steps/thesis”. Critics told me that I should be concerned with how couples interact with each other during courtship in different scenarios.

    +Most critics identified the biggest issue of my prototype during the review and it was coherent to the same problem I had during my user testing. The problem with my first prototype was that the garment itself was meant to be one user only and had the option of sharing with another person by expanding the garment larger, which would be your love one.

    The question was then asked by many critics and users that what if the other user that didn’t purchase the garment wanted to wear it by themselves but can’t separate from one and another, wouldn’t it be better if the garment was able to separate into 2 individual pieces? This idea is beneficial for couples that want a stronger intimacy during courtship while they are sharing one garment, because now couples are able to separate from each other when one or both users need to have personal ...

  • Online_132_

    I conducted my second user testing through an online survey system so that I can get as many feedbacks as I can. The advantage of collecting answers this way is enormous. First of all, I can contact people no matter where they are as long as they can be wired. In other words, I can contact people from various kinds of areas who have different cultural backgrounds. I actually send some of my surveys to Asian countries and European countries as well as United State. (I have few friends over there.) In this way, I can expect answers from more diverse areas. This is a great opportunity to see how universal my icons are. Another advantage of this method is its quantity of answers that I can collect. Since my design is all about universality, it is essential to get a great number of answers and analyze how they are interpreted in a big scale. In other words, the more correct answers I get, the more universal my icons are.

    Image 1 Image 2

  • ピクチャ_1_132_

    I am thinking about simple Package/Dispenser system for my icons shown in the picture. Each icon comes in a roll which is individually put through a rod. Pharmacists can look at all icons at once and pick up right ones categorized based on “INSTRUCTIONS” “WARNIGS” “CAUTIONS”. In this way, they don't get confused when they pick up icons.

    Details 1 Details 2

  • Mid-Term Review

    Well-being

    In the mid-term review, I received many useful feedbacks. I have summarized those so that I can reference to them for my next step.

    Most of people told me that my icons make sense but had questions about how they are distributed in a real situation where pharmacists have to apply my tags onto drug containers in a simple and consistent manner. It is clear that a pharmacist is a very busy job. Adding just an extra work of applying tags in addition to their normal jobs does not sound so hard, however it is quite a complex work when they are tied up with other works and have to manage them at the same time. As a solution to that, I have to come up with an organized distribution system for my icons so that pharmacists can quickly and accurately pick up right ones out of many other icons and apply them. I think I need to sort my icons based on some categories (dosage, frequency? etc,,,) and put them together in ways that pharmacists can easily recognize my icons. (in booklets, rolls or sheets?)

    The other comment that I got during the review is about the ergonomics of my design. People often say that my tags look a little bit unstable on a container. Since my tags are constantly exposed to the contact of patients’ hands, they have to be more stable and durable. I think the problem with fragile of my icons derived from both my material choice and attaching method. I have to think about the material for final prototype which is more lasting. (I am just using ink-jet printed illustr...

Is it possible to generate products that are sensuous and smart, beguiling and ethically grounded?

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A Good Life 6 - Parsons The New School for Design

New York, NY 10003
United States

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