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  • be+cause

    Environment, Fashion Design

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    be+cause, is a socially conscious clothing line of women’s and men’s tops and accessories. The line officially started in 2005, by its founders, Erin Potts & Deyden Tethong, who have worked with social causes and a roster of talented artists and designers for more than a decade.

    be+cause really tells the story of Erin and Deyden: two young activists concerned about the world, but who rejected its never-have-fun lifestyle. Their insistence that you can do good while having a good time took them on an unbelievable journey that included working with the Beastie Boys and dozens of other musicians, co-founding the Tibetan Freedom Concerts, working with fashion icons like Marc Jacobs, Triple 5 Soul, and Built by Wendy, and finally making their own label. When asked why they set out to do all of this, they respond with a single word: because.

  • Difficult Content

    Communication, Communication Design

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    What a wonderful collection of daring questions.

    Who Knew is an information design network devoted to 'difficult content' - ideas and issues that are commonly misunderstood and censored. Every 3 months, students graphically communicate texts considered complex, confusing and/or controversial - things that make us go, "Who knew?" Who Knew studies the interpretive power of graphics and typography in the access, efficiency and transparency of information.

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  • 9Volt Battery LED Lamp

    Arts & Culture, Industrial Design

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    Richart Lawson’s in-demand 9Volt Battery LED Lamp has finally gone into mass production, and is available for purchase. This cleverly cute little Battery Lamp works by simply popping the tiny lamp on any 9-volt you have lying around the house. If you want the clever little lamp, you can simply purchase it at Mathmos.co.uk!

    Via Inhabitat - Thanks Evelyn.

  • Environmentally-Friendly Light Source

    Environment, Industrial Design

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    Artist Stephen Hurrel and scientist Bob Farrell are developing an environmentally-friendly light source. Using flexible solar cells to power LEDs, they aim to generate light, which is then transmitted through dramatic panels made of recycled plastics and glass.

    Our panels could become the building blocks with which architects and others create a new generation of stunning but environmentally-friendly light installations.

    One of the first applications is expected to be a 'lamp' that would stand on a windowsill soaking up sunlight by day, powering the LEDs, and emit its own light at night. A state-of-the-art design aimed at the high end of the market, the lamp would be intended to make a striking eco-statement. Furthermore, because the panels are flexible - and obviously require no mains power - it is hoped they will be of interest to architects and designers looking for an eye-catching, cutting-edge but practical way of lighting public places and spaces.

    As development work continues to create a prototype, Stephen says: We are working to determine a formula that will result in the necessary scale, form and light quality. Once we have this confirmed, the possibilities are endless. As well as panels, our work could take the form of tubes or circles, for example, making the ideal building block for architects and others. In fact, we think it could offer an important new marker in the search for environmentally-friendly energy solutions.

    The project is supported by NESTA. See ...

  • What the World Eats

    Poverty, Communication Design

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    In this photo essay, time Peter Menzel shows families from around the world gathered with one week's worth of food. I don't know whose diet mine is closest too, but my expanding belly says I'm an American.

    What the World Eats, Part 1

  • A discussion about Vulgarism

    Arts & Culture, Industrial Design

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    I would like to continue the discussion that I started in my latest David Report bulletin. The issue is called Vulgarism and concerns the ongoing convergence between design and art. At the recent Milan Furniture Fair we saw teapots in super size, huge Pinocchio dolls in mosaic, porcelain horse heads and knitted dogs. Is design flirting with art, or is it art flirting with design? I have got lots of feedback which prove that it is important that the Vulgarism is discussed and that serious questions about it are brought onto the agenda.

    A new money-driven scene is created when the art galleries suddenly see a possibility to commercialize a current trend in the design world. Or is it the other way round; the trend is created by the galleries? As I mentioned in the Vulgarism bulletin Ambra Medda, the founder of Design Miami, sees a great demand of design-art from celebrities and young wealthy couples. It is maybe just natural that the designers would like to grab the money and consequently line up to take part in the rat-race?

    I would like to quote Philip Wood from Citizen-Citizen who responded to the bulletin: “Just because it’s expensive and limited edition doesn’t make it art”. That is very true. I think that most people involved in the art world would agree. But what about design? What do all people involved in the design world say? A somewhat pushing question could be; is it design at all? According to me design is closely associated with industrial production, so a certai...

  • 100% Design - LONDON 2007

    Arts & Culture, Industrial Design

    About 100% Design

    All our exhibitors are vetted by a selection panel that contains the most important movers and shakers in the industry from the UK's foremost contemporary furniture retailers, to a clutch of heavyweight designers. It means that every stand at the show meets our own exacting criteria ensuring that the show is kept truly 100% Design.

    While we have always prided ourselves on creating an event where real business can take place, we also believe an exhibition should be fun. Over the years 100% Design has become renowned for the quality of its exhibition design, its food and arguably most important of all its bar. It's a place where visitors can catch up with old friends, be inspired by new ideas and catch a glimpse of the future.

  • Launch Pad

    Arts & Culture, Industrial Design

    Launch Pad™ AUSTRALIA

    Launch Pad is the most extensive Australian initiative aimed at directly developing the careers of Australian product designers. Held in conjunction with Saturday in Design®, the Launch Pad events program includes an exhibition of finalists prototypes, mentoring and networking events, and critique from both judges and an International Review Panel.

  • Saturday Indesign

    Arts & Culture, Industrial Design

    Saturday in Design Friday 27th and Saturday 28th July, Sydney, AUSTRALIA Over 90 participants, 60 locations and countless design launches made for a jam-packed schedule for Friday and Saturday. This year’s event saw companies across the city offering warm hospitality, design talks, a chance to meet designers and a glimpse into current design trends and future directions. Across the city and the suburbs, bright oranges flags decorated showrooms within each design precinct, with hordes of visitors popping in and out of showrooms at their leisure.

    With so much to see and do, the CarriageWorks space in Redfern and PYD building in Waterloo, which contained a number of design companies, made for a time-effective visit. There was high drama to be found around town, with an opera singer at James Richardson, a geisha and goth at Alternative Surfaces, and high culture in the art “installation” at Gelosa. Others preferred to take it down a notch in the simple farm atmosphere at Eco Concepts, listen to the jazz at Precision Flooring or take a breather at the oxygen bar at Work Arena.

    There was a distinctly international flavour this year with the “Danish with the Danish” at Interstudio and African food, music and dancing at Krost System Furniture. All in all, Saturday in Design was a celebration of design and creativity; spectators watched glass blowers at work at Diffuse, viewed the architects and designers version of the Archibald at Haworth, and were invited to contribute to...

  • The Watercone

    Poverty, Industrial Design

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    The Watercone is one of those brilliant "Why didn't anyone think of that before" devices. You fill it with salt water and wait while the heat from the sun causes the water to evaporate, catching it in a gutter on the side - distilling the water. When it's done, you flip it over and open the bottle top to release the water. A simple, low-cost way to distill fresh water from salt water.

    via The Seitch Blog

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