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  • Adopt a Cause

    Environment

    Green_leaders_post_1_177_

    This week we discussed the possibility of adopting a New York cause. Coming together and leveraging our individual contacts could make a difference in the community. Therefore, in addition to networking, we could stand behind something to make a difference.

    Would you like to focus on sustainable design, environmental issues, renewable energy, etc.? Or, would you like to remain a social group?

    Please give us your ideas and feel free to respond with feedback.

  • WebPM - Indonesian Web Project Managers Network

    Community, Communication Design

    • If you're indonesian or living in indonesia
    • if you're freelance web designer / web developer
    • if you're need to share project or to find a sub-contractors

    Joining WebPM... is the best answer... WebPM - Mailing List

    www.webpm.or.id

  • Temporary Grocery Bags

    Environment, Environmental Design

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    When I first arrived in Seoul, had noticed that the waste disposal system here was completely user pays. Pre-paid local council issued garbage bags of varying sizes are avaiable from convenience stores everywhere. So when I was asked to make a work for SSamzie Gallery’s Think Green exhibition, thought it might be nice to propose a double use for these garbage bags.

    In Seoul, you have to pay (100 won) for your plastic grocery bags at the supermarket and some corner shops, so thought I might suggest that instead of getting one of those, is to buy a garbage bag and use it as a grocery bag temporarily. precycling, i guess.

    For the show, I made a limited edition print of the suggestion on the reverse side of actual council garbage bags.

    Think Green group show SSamzie Gallery SSamziegil, Insadong Gwanhun-dong 38 Jongno-gu Seoul

    23 May - 24 June 2007

    http://tinyurl.com/23f8uo http://www.treehugger.com/files/2007/06/grocerybagtod.php

  • 24laptop

    Nicholas Negroponte's $100 One Laptop Per Child Program has experienced some setbacks as of late (significantly incresed cost being one of the biggest), so the project has decided on a different approach: marketing. This articles in the New York Times outlines the new charitable strategy of One Laptop, where someone purchases two laptops for $399: one for themselves, and one that will be shipped to a child in a developing nation.

    The article points one unknown side effect of One Laptop's new approach: what will people do with thier own durable green-and-white laptop? Is it safe to say that most people paying the $399 have already bought their own kids a MacBook? What then of the "extra" laptop? Any suggestions?

  • The Green School Movement

    Environment, Environmental Design

    My article on the green school movement, "Education by Design" appeared in this month's issue of Good Magazine.

    It's about the surge in the construction of sustainable schools--and the hold up in building more. The financial statistics are mind blowing: The savings in energy alone would total $100,000 per school per year. Multiply that by the number of schools in the US and your mouth will drop at how much money we are wasting when there are so many books to be bought, teachers to be hired, and test scores to be raised. Then factor in how green schools would improve the general health of students and teachers(think asthma rates, sickness from mold and exposure to insulation), and it becomes clear how necessary and exciting this movement is. The good news is that many fabulous architects (and schools) have jumped on the bandwagon to further the cause. In my article, I focus mainly on Boora Architects in Portland and the Cuningham Group in Minnesota, but there are countless others who are helping build an evironmentally and peope-friendly future for American education.

    In fact, Treehugger published a great article on ARC's new sustainable modular classrooms --an important addition to sustainable design, especially for school districts that are growing out of their buildings too quickly for new construction. No more moldy portables with rain leaking through the ceiling and onto your history textbook!

    ...
  • Plastic_bottles_2_large_177_

    Candy wrappers and plastic bottles turn out to be incredibly versatile materials when recycled. Now, Argentina's Experimental Center for Economical Housing (Centro Experimental de la Vivienda Económica - CEVE) is using these materials as the basis for building bricks. According to The Temas Blog, the bricks are light, durable, and inexpensive.Additionally, the organization has also created a roofing material that combines plastic bottles with crushed peanut shells and/or wood shavings. Funded in part by Germany's technical cooperation agency GTZ, CEVE gathers materials for the bricks from a municipal recycling plant, school and government collection centers, and a bottling plant that donates its rejects.

  • Here's to the crazy ones...

    Communication, Communication Design

    With thanks to Steven Brant for this link, via. Think Differently.

  • TOM DIXON: THE GREAT LIGHT GIVEAWAY

    Environment, Environmental Design

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    Last week saw Tom Dixon’s low-energy light installation, in London’s Trafalgar Square, and the third and final day ended with a bang when the designer gave away 1000 of his eco GLOWB lights to 1000 lucky Londoners. Powered by a renewable energy source the lights have been lit for 3 hours per day from 7pm – 10pm Monday and Tuesday, and Wednesday 19th from 5pm – 10pm. See more of my photo’s from The Great Light Giveaway over on Flickr, and see my original coverage written for Inhabitat.com.

  • GREENPEACE LAUNCHES DIMMABLE ECO BULB in London

    Environment, Environmental Design

    Lightgarden8_177_

    The UK’s first fully dimmable energy efficient light bulb was launched today, as part of a Greenpeace initiative at 100% Design London. Greenpeace commissioned top designer Jason Bruges to create an interactive garden of light, which responds to human movement through “touch pads” dotted around the installation. This is the first lighting project of its kind in the world to use fully dimmable, compact fluorescent bulbs.

    Greenpeace explains: Energy efficiency is one of the most powerful tools we have for fighting climate change, and this installation will prove that going green doesn’t mean sacrificing good design. The bulbs themselves have been nominated in the “most innovative lighting” category at the 100% Design London awards, and the installation has been moved to the front of house feature space. It’s a sure sign that the exhibition organisers have realised that they have something new and exciting on their hands.

    Article written on Inhabitat.com.

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