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  • MedX -MED"EXACT"

    Aid, Industrial Design

    Medx_design21_177_

    RFID Device and System for Storing Patients' Medical Histories

    It is too hard to transfer the medical history of a patient from past doctor to the new doctor, and when a patient is unconscious in an emergency, it is extremely hard for paramedics to know about the medical information of the patient.

    MedX is a portable and affordable device with a standardized system that provides accurate and immediate medical history of a patient while maintaining their privacy through RFID(Radio Frequency IDentification) technology.

    MedX allows the doctor to provide appropriate medical care to each patient and illiminate guesswork in emergency situations. It provides peace of mind for patients as well as doctors.

    Although the current target of MedX is with U.S, I plan to collaborate with doctors in Africa as this would also be the ideal solution for Africa due to its convenience and affordability.

  • The Museum of Nature

    Environment, Audio/Visual Design

    Museum-1-web_177_

    I recently came across the great work of Finnish photographer Ilkka Halso. His recent photographic series the 'Museum of Nature' wonderfully challenges the natural environment from its current state into a future world where it is something we have to visit to experience.

    The collection of compelling images pictures a series of man-made structures that enclose nature, protecting it from pollution. Using images of nature and 3D digital manipulation, this photographic collection captures a future vision of nature as a museum display. Challenging the audience's interaction with the endangered artifact of the natural environment, Halso manages to truly visualise a future we so desperately do not want to see a reality.

    This is a thoroughly engaging project, that although I appreciate BLDGBLOG's suggestion as to how appropriate these images would be as illustrations to a form of eco-catastrophic novel. I feel personally these images could stand-alone in any city or urban environment to remind us how precious our natural environment is truly becoming.

  • Maxwellshowboard_177_

    Made closely in part with Rachel Lehr, cofounder of Rubia, Inc., an NFP that works “to serve women in rural Afghanistan, through education, skills training and promotion of their hand-embroidered textiles... Rubia is creating new traditions in textiles by translating the heritage and skills of Afghan women into sustainable livelihoods.”

    Loti is an effort to sustain and revive the traditional craft of the Darrai Noor region of Afghanistan and dispose of its toxic processes by overlaying their embroidery upon the contemporary craft process of wide-format digital printing. This venture ensures that the processes that have led us to where we are today will be sustained before they skip a generation and are forever lost or mass imitated.

    Taking inspiration through nature, loti is a line of pillows initially made biculturally - in part here in the US, embodying the impressive, almost magical use of digital textile printing, and finished in Afghanistan, handcrafted by women in Darrai Noor. The dimensions of the pillows are chosen based on two factors; one - market desirability, and two, maximal use of yardage.

    Loti encourages a cross-culture dialogue in fabric that shares and explores common beauty between two counties at war through revolutionary production linking producers, designers, and consumers in a hands-on way. In addition to a line of pillowss, loti is a system that is built to enhance the economy of Afghanistan. Initially, loti fabric will be printed in the ...

  • Maxwellshowboard_177_

    Made closely in part with Rachel Lehr, cofounder of Rubia, Inc., an NFP that works “to serve women in rural Afghanistan, through education, skills training and promotion of their hand-embroidered textiles... Rubia is creating new traditions in textiles by translating the heritage and skills of Afghan women into sustainable livelihoods.”

    Loti is an effort to sustain and revive the traditional craft of the Darrai Noor region of Afghanistan and dispose of its toxic processes by overlaying their embroidery upon the contemporary craft process of wide-format digital printing. This venture ensures that the processes that have led us to where we are today will be sustained before they skip a generation and are forever lost or mass imitated.

    Taking inspiration through nature, loti is a line of pillows initially made biculturally - in part here in the US, embodying the impressive, almost magical use of digital textile printing, and finished in Afghanistan, handcrafted by women in Darrai Noor. The dimensions of the pillows are chosen based on two factors; one - market desirability, and two, maximal use of yardage.

    Loti encourages a cross-culture dialogue in fabric that shares and explores common beauty between two counties at war through revolutionary production linking producers, designers, and consumers in a hands-on way. In addition to a line of pillowss, loti is a system that is built to enhance the economy of Afghanistan. Initially, loti fabric will be printed in the ...

  • Maxwellshowboard_177_

    Made closely in part with Rachel Lehr, cofounder of Rubia, Inc., an NFP that works “to serve women in rural Afghanistan, through education, skills training and promotion of their hand-embroidered textiles... Rubia is creating new traditions in textiles by translating the heritage and skills of Afghan women into sustainable livelihoods.”

    Loti is an effort to sustain and revive the traditional craft of the Darrai Noor region of Afghanistan and dispose of its toxic processes by overlaying their embroidery upon the contemporary craft process of wide-format digital printing. This venture ensures that the processes that have led us to where we are today will be sustained before they skip a generation and are forever lost or mass imitated.

    Taking inspiration through nature, loti is a line of pillows initially made biculturally - in part here in the US, embodying the impressive, almost magical use of digital textile printing, and finished in Afghanistan, handcrafted by women in Darrai Noor. The dimensions of the pillows are chosen based on two factors; one - market desirability, and two, maximal use of yardage.

    Loti encourages a cross-culture dialogue in fabric that shares and explores common beauty between two counties at war through revolutionary production linking producers, designers, and consumers in a hands-on way. In addition to a line of pillowss, loti is a system that is built to enhance the economy of Afghanistan. Initially, loti fabric will be printed in the ...

  • The Rubbish Vortex

    Environment, Audio/Visual Design

    Rubbishvortex_132_

    We all know about the fabulous IFF Crochet Coral Reef (the press has been outstanding!), but do not miss out on the very crafty Rubbish Vortex as well, created by Helle Jorgensen, a star contributor to the Coral Reef Project.

    Jorgensen's complex and mesmerizing vortex of recycled plastic bags thriftily spun into crocheting yarn is a brilliant solution to a menacing global problem.

    See the artist's blog, Gooseflesh, for more visuals and details: http://hellejorgensen.typepad.com/gooseflesh/therubbishvortex/index.html

    All of the artist's work, including her accessories, are state-of-the-enviro-art.

  • Go forth and aggregate

    Community, Communication Design

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    One of the key business technology trends of 2008, according to The McKinsey Quarterly [registration required], is making businesses from capturing information.

    As we know from shopping sites and business-to-business product directories on the net, there's money to be made from accumulated pools of data.

    But something we're failing to do in parallel is understand and exploit the value of accumulation and - more importantly - aggregation to social and economic progress.

    A huge amount of information and relationships accumulate in national local government.

    Extensive networks of diverse social, economic and physical assets aggregate around the commercial redevelopment and regeneration of towns and cities.

    A vast diaspora of hopes and interests sit in devolved off and online groups of people, be it 5-a-side soccer leagues, Facebook groups, community gardeners or moderators of Wikipedia.

    There's a vast amount of dispersed energy, enthusiasm, activity and innovation out there. And it's brilliant.

    But a key challenge has to be how public managers - not just designers of online entertainment platforms - public initiatives - not just pressure groups - and central and local government - not just eccentric entrepreneurs or innovators - can aggregate this activity.

    Why bother?

    Because new value might be captured for the benefit of all.

    Go forth and aggregate.

    And start trading and packaging social, not just physical assets.

    ...
  • Reduce your waste

    Environment, Communication Design

    Dscf1774_177_

    I took this shot in Islington, north London, few weeks ago. It is a great initiative to include the suggestion “Reduce your waste. Choose products with less packaging” as part of the design of the truck.

    We all know that by embellishing the package the probabilities of generating sale increases. However, there is no excuse to overuse plastic and cardboard. For example, I recently found in a popular supermarket a small full-colour cardboard container of a 45p chewing-gum wrapped by a delicate plastic protection. Are we inducing clients and customers to use and waste more material?

    It is our job as designers to add value to products not by including unnecessary material but by communicating effectively with simplicity and consideration to the amount of rubbish a single product can cause.

  • Kitchen tools by Dick van Hoff

    Environment, Environmental Design

    Kitchen-tools

    Utrecht Manifest, biannual for Social Design published several articles on design and sustainability. We have selected some products and questioned ourselves about what the sustainable factor is.

    One of the most important factors that ought to be taken into account is extraneous to the product: the consumer’s habituation to specific types of products. Take, for example, our addiction to electrical equipment. Since the invention of the electric vacuum cleaner and the electric lemon squeezer, a massive industry has developed with the aim of avoiding as much manual labour as possible in home and kitchen. This has spawned a never-ending stream of products for our comfort and convenience, but these appliances have undesirable side-effects even without their guzzling of energy. In his introduction to the 1981 book, Design ist Unsichtbar (Design is invisible), design historian Lucius Burckhardt tackles böse Objekte – ‘malign objects’ – and uses the example of the electric onion-cutter, which is intended to cut onions swiftly without the user enduring malodorous hands. However, in order to clean the machine it has to be dismantled, thus losing any time gained and leaving the user with smelly fingers all the same. The usual solution devised by designers, who think in terms of objects instead of problems: an onion-cutter cleaning machine. Ad infinitum. Burckhardt was saying that designers should devote more attention to cohesive systems than to autonomous objects that completely ignor...

  • Living and Working together

    Community, Environmental Design

    Livingandworkingtogether-4

    'Living and Working together' was an exhibition from November 25th 2007 to January 11th. It was organised within the context of Utrecht Manifest, a design biannual for Social Design. Some of the products or ideas can now be seen until May the 12th in the exhibition 'Design and the elastic mind' in the MOMA New York

    Living and Working together showed about twenty inspirational graduation projects from international design courses. A growing social awareness is a characteristic of many young designers. The exhibition presented fresh concepts and products for the international society of the future, sometimes bluntly simplistic and sometimes highly detailed.

    The participating schools were: Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, England Design Academy Eindhoven, the Netherlands Escola Superior de Artes e Design, Portugal Fabrica, Italy Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy George Brown College, Institute without Boundaries, Canada Utrecht School of the Arts (HKU), the Netherlands Izmir University of Economics, Faculty of Fine Arts and Design, Turkey Royal College of Art, England Staatliche Hochschule für Gestaltung Karlsruhe, Germany

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