Community

Community

1 Supporter

  • Languages Matter!

    Community, Communication Design

    Languageposter_132_

    This poster represents a visual interpretation of the quote "A different language is a different vision of life" described by linguists Benjamin Lee Whorf and Edward Sapir, anthropologist Franz Boas, and most popularly attributed to Italian movie director Federico Fellini. The iris represents a satellite view of planet Earth and is looking towards the background. In the background, the quote is translated into various languages spanning the global community: English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, French, Filipino, Italian, Japanese, Swahili, Portuguese, Greek, Russian, Romanian, and Inuit. These languages represent only a portion of the planet which reflects accordingly back on the iris; the iris contains only a partial view of planet Earth. As captured by Linguist K. David Harrison in his work "When Languages Die," "language disappearance is an erosion or extinction of ideas, of ways of knowing and ways of talking about the world and human experience." Acquisition of multiple languages enables an individual to "see the world through another's eyes." The individual is allowed a new in-"sight", a new thought, a new idea into the human condition. Without having this list of languages to look at, the iris would be staring at an empty background.

  • Languages Matter!

    Peace, Communication Design

    2_132_

    International Mother Language Day...

  • aahaaay...

    Peace, Communication Design

    1_132_

    International Mother Language Day...

  • languages matter

    Arts & Culture, Communication Design

    Graphic1_132_

    languages matter

  • languages matter!

    Communication, Communication Design

    Tarhe-1-b_550x550__132_

    languages matter!

  • Vernacular

    Aid, Communication Design

    Mosabeghe_550x550__132_

    Vernacular = mother languages

  • Poster-final-0a

    The Global Exhibition of Posters Concerning Innovation & Flourish in Civic Administrator Ship | 2008

  • Group 72

    Arts & Culture, Audio/Visual Design

    Poster-final-side-a-

    Poster for Group Painting Exhibition | 2008

  • Cassra abedini 's Bazaar

    Arts & Culture, Audio/Visual Design

    Cassra-abedini_s-bazaar_132_

    Poster for Solo Graphic Exhibition | M. Momayez Gallery | Iranian Artist Forum | Tehran | 2008

  • Graffiti

    Environment, Environmental Design

    Graffiti_1_177_

    The search for truth can take us to the most unlikely places. For graffiti artists, manipulating letters became lifeblood and fighting back meant getting ill, and ill-legible. Once harnessed, an unusual torrent of creative, language-based experimentation and expression flowed from urban cities. It turned tables, oppressed the oppressor, and lit the fuse for a contemporary graffiti movement.

    "Getting up", the recognition that comes with the near constant act of tagging your name, became the driving force in the nascent graffiti scene. As a result the application of tags proliferated through crowded urban housing projects and high-traffic public transit systems until surfaces were covered in permanent inks. The competitive nature of graffiti, a hold-over from urban gang activity, was played out in non-violent "battles" that featured spray cans and skill instead of knives and strength. (The competitive nature of graffiti would seep into and boost the related youth sub-culture of hip-hop dance and music.) More importantly, competition brought about the stylistic innovations that were necessary to distinguish one tag from the rest. These revealed themselves in unique hand styles and lettering including the use of bubble letters, complicated scripts, calligraphic flourishes, flexible ascenders and descenders, new ligatures, simple illustrations, and cartoon characters. In many cases a combination of these left tags illegible to all but the graffiti artists. By...

This is the headline for Community

Join This Group

Community

United States

Contact Community

Moderator: Admin Admin