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Dorota Dyman & Associates Real Estate

Dorota Dyman & Associates Real Estate

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  • Article-0-1d00cbfb00000578-765_634x421_177_

    House prices are rising, spring is in the air and the property market is blooming. Estate agency and lettings chain Martin & Co floated on the stock market in December and is ideally positioned to benefit from the new mood. At 129p, the shares offer robust, long-term value.

    Martin & Co was founded by entrepreneur Richard Martin in the 1980s. Starting out in Yeovil, Somerset, the business did well and in 1996, the company adopted a franchise model so it could grow at a faster pace without recourse to the banks.

    Under this structure, agents run their own businesses but have access to Martin & Co’s support and experience in areas such as IT, marketing, shopfitting and training. They also benefit from collective purchasing and in exchange, they give the company 9 per cent of their annual revenues.

    The system works in part because many Martin agents come from other professions, ranging from policemen to vicars to tennis coaches. They are looking for change, they want to run their own businesses but they need training and advice to be able to set up and Martin & Co gives provides them with this help. Even seasoned agents like the idea of support from a larger parent and many are given financial help too, particularly in the early years.

    The company now has 160 franchisees operating 190 branches from Scotland to Devon. Until recently, the business focused exclusively on letting, working with landlords, finding them tenants and managing their properties. In...

  • Id-10044953_177_

    The market can be tough for first-time buyers so with the spring homebuying season now in full swing (March through June are the year’s four

    busiest months), here are some tips for first-time homebuyers.

    With two daughters and a baby on the way, Carlos and Cinthya Jijon decided last year to buy a house for about the same monthly cost as a bigger apartment. But they couldn’t find a home.

    Supply was tight. And investors armed with fistfuls of cash outbid them every time.

    This month, however, the Jijons are unpacking, settling into a one-story house in Buena Park, Calif. The auto-parts deliveryman and the nurse made the transition from renters to first-time homebuyers.

    The market is tough for first-time buyers such as the Jijons, and statistics show the number of first-timers is falling.

    But the Jijons persevered, taking an eight-hour homebuying course, learning about cash-assistance programs, and getting loads of practical advice. They beat the odds.

    With the spring homebuying season now in full swing (March through June are the year’s four busiest months), here are some tips for first-time homebuyers.

    Determine what you can afford. The first step is to meet with a lender, review your finances and find out how much you can afford to spend on

    a home and how much you have for your down payment.

    “If they qualify for a $300,000 house, they shouldn’t be wasting their time looking at a $500,000 house,” says Maritza Reyna, an education manager at Consumer Credit Coun...

  • City_street_177_

    Real-estate legend Sam Zell said recently that the “End of Suburbia” might be happening. Right here and now.

    Of course, all the suburban dreck that was built in the last six decades isn’t going to vaporize. But, in terms of new construction — in other words, the real estate development business — reproducing the postwar, automobile-dependent Suburbia pattern is a money-losing proposition.

    “You’re drawing all the young people in America to these 24/7 cities,” said Zell last October. “The last thing they want to do is live in the suburbs.”

    Of course, as people get a little older, compromises ensue. But, that doesn’t mean they like it. “Why would anyone live in the suburbs, except to provide schools for their kids?” Zell asked.

    The first criticisms of the American automobile suburb began about the same time as the suburbs themselves appeared in the 1920s and expanded in the postwar period. “There’s no there there,” lamented Gertrude Stein about Oakland, California, in 1937. She would know — she grew up there.

    But, if we aren’t going to build suburbs, what should we build?

    I propose that we build what I call the Traditional City — the normal form of human urban living for the last five thousand years. The Traditional City is the basic form of historic cities in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, and both pre-Columbian and post-Columbian Americas.

    It is the form of ancient Rome, of the Aztecs’ capital city Tenochtitlan, of ...

  • Waystoscreenlandlord0327_177_

    The real estate rental market/) is fast paced, competitive and sometimes daunting. During the stress of finding a rental that fits your needs, you sometimes run into yet another brick wall: the landlord. Some landlords can be nosey people. Every corner your turn at an apartment viewing they’re racking off another list of things they need before you’re approved. But before you slip your social, you might want to do some research of your own. Here are five ways to screen your landlord or property manager before you sign a lease.

    1. Find Foreclosures

    According to the Wall Street Journal, it’s an entirely possible that your dream apartment is in the foreclosure process. Meaning, a landlord could try to rent an apartment he or she doesn’t even own. You could lose your deposit, and worse, your home.

    Look into tax records and find out who actually owns the rental. Additionally, if you’re dealing with a property management company, research any recent foreclosures for their properties. If the company is underwater or filing for bankruptcy, your lease terms might be shorter than you think.

    2. Check Criminal Records

    It’s important to know your landlord’s prior convictions. From fraud to assault, your potential property manager could have a horrifying history.

    If a criminal record can disqualify a potential tenant, then why not a landlord? eHow.com has several tips on ways to search for criminal records.

    3. Consider Complaints

    Yahoo.com suggests investigating poten...

  • Personal-data_177_

    Jill Chodorov, a real estate agent with Long & Foster, writes an occasional column about local market trends and housing issues.

    Homebuyers beware. If you are nervous about having your financial information hacked when purchasing linens for your new home at Target, have you considered how easily your private data can be lifted from your Mortgage Company or real estate broker during the home-buying process?

    If you haven’t thought about it, maybe it is high time that you did.

    In a recent study conducted by HALOCK Security Labs, a cyber-security consulting firm based in Schaumburg, Ill., it was discovered that seven out of 10 mortgage companies allow information-sharing practices that put your personal and financial data at grave risk.

    According to Terry Kurzynksi, founder and senior partner of HALOCK, “the entire real estate industry ecosystem is bad.” Kurzynski used Experian’s (one of the three major credit bureaus) recent involvement in an identity theft scheme affecting 500,000 Americans as an example.

    Don Frommeyer, president of the National Association of Mortgage Brokers, disputes the findings of the survey. He said people in his industry are careful with buyers’ personal information and he doubts there’s a a problem in his industry. Still, he said, consumers should feel free to inquire about lenders’ policies on handling private data.

    “It is a good idea to ask your lender how they will handle your personal information and what do they do with it ...

  • Tips_multiple-offer_177_

    *Synced from Seattle and Real Estate Blog

    In regions with booming real estate markets, sellers may think getting multiple offers on their home is inevitable, but there are a few things you can do to increase your chances. The three must-haves for attracting multiple offers, according to Zillow, are location, price and presentation.

    You’ve heard it time and again: location, location, location. Buyers often consider location before other factors such as price, number of bedrooms or home size, so a well-located home is a huge advantage. Homes on busy streets, near freeway on/off ramps, or in less-than-stellar school districts may not attract as much interest. Work with a real estate agent to price your home very carefully if it’s not in a prime location.

    That brings us to the next factor: price. Zillow reports that homes priced 10 percent over their market value will not get noticed, so it’s important to be smart and realistic with your listing price. While you won’t truly know the market value of your home until a buyer closes on the sale, real estate agents can help you establish a value range based on factors such as whether you are in a buyers’ or sellers’ market, location, and how well your home shows. If you price your home at the lower end of that range, you can be pretty confident you’ll generate lots of interest.

    While you can’t change your home’s location and prices can fluctuate based on any number of factors, presentation of your home is something y...

  • Vmjmigw_177_

    The market can be tough for first-time buyers so with the spring home-buying season now in full swing (March through June are the year’s four busiest months), here are some tips for first-time homebuyers.

    With two daughters and a baby on the way, Carlos and Cinthya Jijon decided last year to buy a house for about the same monthly cost as a bigger apartment. But they couldn’t find a home.

    Supply was tight. And investors armed with fistfuls of cash outbid them every time.

    This month, however, the Jijons are unpacking, settling into a one-story house in Buena Park, Calif. The auto-parts deliveryman and the nurse made the transition from renters to first-time homebuyers.

    The market is tough for first-time buyers such as the Jijons, and statistics show the number of first-timers is falling.

    But the Jijons persevered, taking an eight-hour home-buying course, learning about cash-assistance programs, and getting loads of practical advice. They beat the odds.

    With the spring homebuying season now in full swing (March through June are the year’s four busiest months), here are some tips for first-time homebuyers.

    Determine what you can afford. The first step is to meet with a lender, review your finances and find out how much you can afford to spend on a home and how much you have for your down payment.

    “If they qualify for a $300,000 house, they shouldn’t be wasting their time looking at a $500,000 house,” says Maritza Reyna, an education manager at Consumer Credit Counse...

  • De-stressing_177_

    We must also not forget about the stress involved in moving to a new location. After all, one is leaving familiar surroundings and neighbours behind for good. Simultaneously, it often becomes necessary to get acclimatised to a new area where everyone is a stranger.

    What are some of the most difficult and emotionally stressful experiences in any person's life? We can easily list the top four:

    The death of a loved one Breakdown of a marriage Change of jobs Buying a home Does the last point really belong in this list? Actually, it does. Anyone who has ever been through the process of buying a home will agree that there is a lot of insecurity involved in such an operation. People ask themselves a lot of questions when buying a house:

    "Are we doing the right thing?" "Is this the right time?" "Is this the right area/neighborhood/flat? I liked the previous one better." We must also not forget about the stress involved in moving to a new location. After all, one is leaving familiar surroundings and neighbours behind for good. Simultaneously, it often becomes necessary to get acclimatized to a new area where everyone is a stranger. Finally, the expenses involved in buying a home are easily the biggest financial responsibility any of us will ever shoulder.

    As a matter of fact, it is not just the process of buying a new home that can be stressful. Even leaving the old self-owned home behind can take an emotional toll. The questions we tend...

  • Scczen_a_141213splcommprop10_620x310_177_

    International investors with a total of US$2 trillion ($2.34 trillion) in funds have put New Zealand in their top-10 list of Asia-Pacific real estate investment targets.

    A survey out this month from the Association of Non-Listed Real Estate Investors put New Zealand on its list for the first time, said Justin Kean, JLL New Zealand's head of research and capital markets.

    New Zealand was ranked eighth.

    "The association represents investors with a total portfolio of some US$2 trillion. If international investors allocated just 1 per cent of their assets to the New Zealand market, we would see $20 billion of capital head this way."

    Kean said about $2 billion of commercial real estate./) going for $5 million-plus was sold throughout New Zealand.

    That survey comes after Chapman Tripp said last week that more foreign buyers were likely to make bids for New Zealand assets this year with China at the forefront.

    The law firm has released its view on trends and insights into New Zealand mergers and acquisitions and has picked foreign investment as an important trend in 2014.

    Kean said international investors saw New Zealand as a key Asia-Pacific location.

    "The economy in New Zealand has seen a good organic economic recovery kick in in the last 18 months. Positive pressure is warranting a firming of cap rates which is being driven by a weight of both local and now international capital.

    "Institutional investors are back in a buying mode and this means that fo...

  • Agent_300x200_177_

    Article Source

    The real estate industry is sometimes viewed with suspicion - no doubt because some of its entrenched processes appear to essentially betray the interests of the vendor. What agents won't tell you about auctions examines the fact that auctions are favoured by real estate professionals in part because, in the absence of more than one "motivated bidder", the vendor is left in the unenviable position of feeling pressured to sell their property at the very lowest acceptable price (aka "the reserve").

    Are open homes dodgy? alleges that open homes are used brazenly by real estate sales people but not for the purpose one would assume. For some it's less about showing off the actual house for sale and more about making contact with other potential house sellers in the neighbourhood.

    The nature of the commission is the third part of the real estate business that can cause sellers discomfort. Firstly, the reasons behind the fact that an agent's remuneration is based on the value of the house concerned are not widely understood. Why should someone be rewarded more for selling a $5-million property than, say, a $500,000 one? Does it take extra effort to say "state-of-the-art Miele MultiSteam oven" than it does to say "plain old Shacklock oven"? Perhaps it's because marble floors wear out the soles of the real estate sale person's shoes faster than unassuming cork. Or is writing down that extra zero an especially onerous task?

    The...

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