Heated issue

Competition Details
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Re:courses

by Vivian Lee
Co-authors: Carrie Norman

When climate change affects our dinner plate it will be too late for recourse. Re:courses is a menu campaign aimed to educate the public of the most elemental impact of global warming on everyday life: sustenance. The menu advises people to host a dinner party with loved ones: a repast composed of soon-to-be delicacies, a preemptive wake for the everyday food ingredients that are threatened by the effects of global climate change. Learning that we may never taste lobster again promotes an awareness more immediate than statistics and news reports, a sudden realization that prompts action.

The three courses are arranged by each ingredient’s proximity to “expiration.” All approximate expiration dates are derived from the current rates of attrition for each species, as cited by noted scientists in the field. All ingredients selected for Re:courses are in peril as a direct result of global warming.

The initial launch of Re:courses could be a fund-raising event, with world leader and celebrity participants to generate public interest in holding their own Re:courses. Other publications such as a Re:courses Cookbook could involve more detailed scientific data paired with celebrated chef recipes.

Re:courses shortens the distance between our table and the ecological systems that provide for it; abstract notions of “ingredients” are enriched and made real by the knowledge of where they came from and the factors that endanger them. Most importantly, the intangible facts of climate change are brought close to us, we can understand what we are losing when it is measured by the mouthful.

*Cited References

Trout and Salmon:
http://www.nrdc.org/globalWarming/ntrout.asp

Avocados:
http://news.mongabay.com/2006/1204-ca.html

Lobsters:
http://list.terc.edu/pipermail/maine_science/2004-August/004635.html

Milk:
http://www.corrosion-doctors.org/Global-Warming/Introduction.htm

Wild Peanuts and Potatoes:
http://climate.weather.com/articles/study052307.html

Ducks:
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2005-11-28-global-warming-ducks_x.htm

Apricots, Almonds, Raisins, and Olives:
http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/GlobalWarming/story?id=2277893